Women Who Kick Ass

Chelsea Manning is an American Whistleblower who exposed the injustice the US military is doing.
Through WikiLeaks she revealed:
the Collateral Murder video that exposed the killing of unarmed civilians and two Reuters journalists by a US Apache helicopter crew in Iraq
the Afghan War Diary that revealed uninvestigated civilian casualties and contractor abuse
the Iraq War Logs that revealed civilian casualties, and uninvestigated reports of torture
the US diplomatic cables that revealed the role that corporate interests and spying play in international diplomacy
You can send her mail to the following address. Although you must write to Chelsea using her full legal name on the outside of the envelope, you should use her chosen name on the actual letter.
BRADLEY E. MANNING     892891300 NORTH WAREHOUSE ROADFORT LEAVENWORTH, KANSAS 66027-2304
For more information on how to write to Chelsea, see this page.

Chelsea Manning is an American Whistleblower who exposed the injustice the US military is doing.

Through WikiLeaks she revealed:

  • the Collateral Murder video that exposed the killing of unarmed civilians and two Reuters journalists by a US Apache helicopter crew in Iraq
  • the Afghan War Diary that revealed uninvestigated civilian casualties and contractor abuse
  • the Iraq War Logs that revealed civilian casualties, and uninvestigated reports of torture
  • the US diplomatic cables that revealed the role that corporate interests and spying play in international diplomacy

You can send her mail to the following address. Although you must write to Chelsea using her full legal name on the outside of the envelope, you should use her chosen name on the actual letter.

BRADLEY E. MANNING     89289
1300 NORTH WAREHOUSE ROAD
FORT LEAVENWORTH, KANSAS 66027-2304

For more information on how to write to Chelsea, see this page.

nitanahkohe:

What a great story on Abby Abinanti, who in 1974 became the first Native American woman admitted to the State Bar of California. Among her innovations: the first tribal-run program in the nation to help members expunge their criminal records; a pioneering wellness court; and California’s first tribal child support program, which allows for non-cash alternatives to support payments — such as donations of fish or manual labor. These are the kinds of wonderful things that can happen when we have empowered woman leadership in our communities!

Juana Inés de la Cruz: Why she kicks ass

  • Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz was a major Baroque literary figure of Mexico who is a notable poet and scholar.  She studied coupled classical and medieval philosophy but her fierce assertion of a woman’s right to fully participate in scholastic inquiry also mark her as a philosopher.  
• According to Mary Morkovsky, Sor Juana’s philosophical poetry, (Sueno) indicates a coherent world view, and her critique of the Jesuit sermon reveals her mastery of logic.
•  In addition, in the same decade that England’s Mary Astell wrote her argument for the education of women, A Serious Proposal To The Ladies…,in Mexico, Sor Juana was hotly defending a woman’s right to an education and intellectual prowess in Reply to Sor Philothea.
•  By 1693, Sor Juana seemingly ceased writing rather than risk official censure. However, there is no undisputed evidence of her renouncing devotion to letters, though there are documents showing her agreeing to undergo penance. However the authenticity of these documents is highly doubted, due to the rhetorical and autocratic church formulae.
•   In 1667, she entered the Monastery of St. Joseph, a community of the Discalced Carmelite nuns, as a postulant. She chose not to enter that Order, and later, in 1669, she entered the monastery of the Hieronymite nuns.
 • She died after ministering to other nuns stricken during a plague, on 17 April 1695.
  •  An early translation of Sor Juana’s work into English is Ten Sonnets from Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz, 1651-1695: Mexico’s Tenth Muse, published in Taxco, Guerrero, in 1943. One musical work attributed to Sor Juana survives from the archive at Guatemala Cathedral. This is a 4 part villancico, Madre, la de los primores.

Juana Inés de la Cruz: Why she kicks ass

• Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz was a major Baroque literary figure of Mexico who is a notable poet and scholar. She studied coupled classical and medieval philosophy but her fierce assertion of a woman’s right to fully participate in scholastic inquiry also mark her as a philosopher.
• According to Mary Morkovsky, Sor Juana’s philosophical poetry, (Sueno) indicates a coherent world view, and her critique of the Jesuit sermon reveals her mastery of logic.
• In addition, in the same decade that England’s Mary Astell wrote her argument for the education of women, A Serious Proposal To The Ladies…,in Mexico, Sor Juana was hotly defending a woman’s right to an education and intellectual prowess in Reply to Sor Philothea.
• By 1693, Sor Juana seemingly ceased writing rather than risk official censure. However, there is no undisputed evidence of her renouncing devotion to letters, though there are documents showing her agreeing to undergo penance. However the authenticity of these documents is highly doubted, due to the rhetorical and autocratic church formulae.
• In 1667, she entered the Monastery of St. Joseph, a community of the Discalced Carmelite nuns, as a postulant. She chose not to enter that Order, and later, in 1669, she entered the monastery of the Hieronymite nuns.
• She died after ministering to other nuns stricken during a plague, on 17 April 1695.
• An early translation of Sor Juana’s work into English is Ten Sonnets from Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz, 1651-1695: Mexico’s Tenth Muse, published in Taxco, Guerrero, in 1943. One musical work attributed to Sor Juana survives from the archive at Guatemala Cathedral. This is a 4 part villancico, Madre, la de los primores.

lagos2bahia:

kathleenjoy:

Pacific women rise up for a Free West Papua!'Our freedom as indigenous Māori and Pacific women in Aotearoa New Zealand is inextricably bound up with that of our Pacific West Papuan brothers and sisters.'- Oceania Interruptedhttp://urlmin.com/3hmy2Our mouths are adorned with the Morning Star flag as symbol of enforced West Papuan silence. Our hands are bound to symbolise the lack of freedoms experienced by West Papuan people. Our voices and movement are restricted to symbolise the lack of freedom of expression of political opinion, the lack of access to just and equitable resources, the lack of access to free and independent media. Our bodies are adorned with black to celebrate the female form and to draw on black as a symbol of mourning.On behalf of the Free West Papua Campaign and the people of West Papua, thank you so much indigenous Māori and Pacific women in Aotearoa New Zealand. Also, all supporters around the world for standing up for your suffering Melanesian brothers and sisters across the Pacific.With your help, West Papua never free from this illegal Indonesian occupation!FREE WEST PAPUAwww.freewestpapua.org/take-action/

YESS!!

lagos2bahia:

kathleenjoy:

Pacific women rise up for a Free West Papua!

'Our freedom as indigenous Māori and Pacific women in Aotearoa New Zealand is inextricably bound up with that of our Pacific West Papuan brothers and sisters.'- Oceania Interrupted

http://urlmin.com/3hmy2

Our mouths are adorned with the Morning Star flag as symbol of enforced West Papuan silence. 

Our hands are bound to symbolise the lack of freedoms experienced by West Papuan people. 

Our voices and movement are restricted to symbolise the lack of freedom of expression of political opinion, the lack of access to just and equitable resources, the lack of access to free and independent media. 

Our bodies are adorned with black to celebrate the female form and to draw on black as a symbol of mourning.

On behalf of the Free West Papua Campaign and the people of West Papua, thank you so much indigenous Māori and Pacific women in Aotearoa New Zealand. 
Also, all supporters around the world for standing up for your suffering Melanesian brothers and sisters across the Pacific.

With your help, West Papua never free from this illegal Indonesian occupation!

FREE WEST PAPUA

www.freewestpapua.org/take-action/

YESS!!

minn2x:

As a black person this makes me really proud but at the same time it really frustrates me because the news never focus on the positive qualities of blacks which in reality actually out weighs the negatives but the media only focus on the negatives.. why does a 4 year old black boy cussing makes huge media headlines but a 4 year black girl genius does not……that’s what really frustrates me. 

all1sees:

EVERYONE PLEASE. PAY ATTENTION. Especially if you’re Asian.

On January 30th, 2014, California Senate just passed SCA-5, a legislation that would repeal portions of California Proposition 209.

In condensed words, this bill allows schools to DISCRIMINATE AGAINST ASIANS.

To…

angrypeopleofcolorunited:

HAPPY INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY!!!

webofgoodnews:

People Are Carrying Out 318 Random Acts of Kindness Across Boston
Cathy O’Grady wasn’t planning on being identified. But somehow, the media caught wind of her random acts of kindness all over the city this winter after pictures surfaced online of dozens of blankets with $5 gift cards she left out for the homeless.
“It was me,” she admitted. “Somebody squealed on me. I’m not bummed, but I didn’t put it out there for me to be found. But I’m not bummed about it. If I can motivate other people to help out, that’s the purpose of all this.”
Read more 

webofgoodnews:

People Are Carrying Out 318 Random Acts of Kindness Across Boston

Cathy O’Grady wasn’t planning on being identified. But somehow, the media caught wind of her random acts of kindness all over the city this winter after pictures surfaced online of dozens of blankets with $5 gift cards she left out for the homeless.

“It was me,” she admitted. “Somebody squealed on me. I’m not bummed, but I didn’t put it out there for me to be found. But I’m not bummed about it. If I can motivate other people to help out, that’s the purpose of all this.”

Read more 

“hi, are there any stories of kickass girls, not women? I am wondering myself thank you”

—Anonymous

Absolutely! Try checking the tags for girls and teenage girls. And if anyone knows of any we haven’t covered yet, feel free to submit! :-)

fcyeah:

neutrois:

janetmock:

Honored to be one of the many faces featured as part of a collective global Google Doodle, alongside the ever brilliant Cecilia Chung, for International Women’s Day. Watch it today on Google’s homepage (obvi) or YouTube. 

go Janet!

Yessssssss - happy International Women’s Day to ALL women XD

fcyeah:

neutrois:

janetmock:

Honored to be one of the many faces featured as part of a collective global Google Doodle, alongside the ever brilliant Cecilia Chung, for International Women’s Day. Watch it today on Google’s homepage (obvi) or YouTube

go Janet!

Yessssssss - happy International Women’s Day to ALL women XD

selchieproductions:

5 Ways to Support Indigenous Women on International Women’s Day

nitanahkohe:

Every year, March 8th is dedicated by the United Nations as International Women’s Day. It’s a day to honor the unique struggles, strengths, and potential of women around the world, far too many of whom face violence, poverty, environmental destruction, disease, and discrimination on a daily basis…we believe that a community cannot be healthy if its women are not supported and loved – strong women lead to strong families, communities, and nations. Here, we’ve compiled a list of five suggestions to help and celebrate Indigenous women on International Women’s Day.

1. Educate yourself about the epidemic of murdered and missing Indigenous women, a devastating occurrence that far too many people are unaware of – over 800 Aboriginal women have gone missing or been murdered in Canada in the past 20 years, and their cases are rarely thoroughly investigated by police. Start by watching Survival, Strength, and Sisterhood: Power of Women in the Downtown Eastside, a short documentary on the 20 year history of the annual memorial march for missing and murdered Indigenous women in Vancouver. Explore Rabble’s Why I March forum to learn more about families involved in the movement. Find a local showing of the very powerful Walking With Our Sisters exhibition, which honors the lives of these women through a display of hand-made moccasins, each representing a missing woman. Support the Missing Sisters mapping project by learning about open cases in your area and adding any information you are aware of regarding missing Indigenous women. If you’re feeling particularly ambitious read Amnesty International’s report Stolen Sisters, as of now the most comprehensive report on violence against Indigenous women in Canada.  And of course, join the growing voice of people demanding an official inquiry into Canada’s missing and murdered Indigenous women – sign the online petition here, contact your local representatives to voice your concerns, and join the online conversation using the hashtags #MMIW and #VAW.

2. Join PBS’s SheDocs online film festival, featuring twelve short documentaries about inspiring women from around the world. In particular, check out “Kind-Hearted Woman” a film following the struggles and triumphs of a divorced Oglala Sioux mother living on the Spirit Lake Reservation of North Dakota. The coolest part about this film series is that you can join in the online conversation about them using the hashtag #SheDocs on Facebook and Twitter. These films will be available online from March 1-31. Another great film by PBS to watch in honor of International Women’s Day is “Young Lakota,” an new Independent Lens film about three young women fighting to make comprehensive healthcare available to women on the Pine Ridge Reservation. The film is not currently available for viewing online, but you can find details about public screenings as well as a DVD request form here.

3. Lend Financial Support. There are so many organizations doing amazing work with Indigenous women – if you have the money to spare, consider making a donation to an organization such as the First Peoples grantmaking program, which will help fund small-scale Indigenous led development project around the world, the Native Women’s Association of Canada or the Indigenous Women’s Fund (FIMI). If you can’t afford to donate, consider joining a fundraising event such as Walk in Her Shoes. By joining this movement, you’ll receive a pedometer and access to an online fundraising page. By getting people to sponsor you to walk 10,000 steps per day for a week, you’ll raise money to provide for water wells and water and sanitation programs for women around the world. The average woman in Africa must walk far more than 10,000 steps, or 5 miles a day, to collect water from far away sources.

4.  Support girls’ dreams and aspirations. As girls enter puberty they become especially vulnerable to developing negative patterns such as unhealthy relationships, eating disorders, self-esteem issues, alcohol and drug use, unprotected sex, and slacking off in school and other hobbies. Girls living on or near reservations in particular are often exposed to higher rates of substance abuse, teen pregnancy, and youth suicide. Take the time to mentor young girls in your community or family, or volunteer at an organization that works with youth. For inspiration, explore this amazing collection of girls’ dreams from around the world compiled by Girl Effect, and watch the extraordinary documentary Girl Rising.

5. Support a local domestic violence shelter. One in three Native women will be raped in their lifetime. Three in five will be physically assaulted. Native women are more than twice as likely to be stalked as other women and are murdered at a rate of ten times the national average. Underreporting of assault and domestic violence means that these numbers are likely even higher, and unfortunately many of these cases are not properly investigated or prosecuted. This is a huge, multi-dimensional, systemic problem that unfortunately will not be fixed overnight; however, there are many ways to help. Support your local domestic abuse shelter – they typically can use monetary donations as well as donations of household supplies, children’s items, and volunteer time. All such shelters need your support, but some specifically offer services for Native women, such as the amazing Battered Women’s Support Services. And of course, spread the message of non-violent love in your life – the Indian Law Resource Center’s campaign Safe Women, Strong Nations provides great tools for helping others learn about healthy relationships. Help teach the young people you know how to recognize red flags in a relationship, how to negotiate disagreements and disputes without resorting to violence, what consent means, and where to turn for help if they find themselves in a dangerous circumstance.

Happy International Women’s day, everyone!

This is Jules and Simone, sisters and superheroes from the upcoming webseries, Sisters of Mercy. This show is in the preproduction stage, and we’re trying to build an audience. Watch our trailer, send us your hopes and dreams for female superhero characters, give us some encouragement, share with your friends and followers, show us some love!
Sometimes ridiculous and sometimes dead serious, Sisters of Mercy applies a feminist lens to the superhero genre. It’s about complicated and complex women characters, women working together, women making jokes - starring two women of colour!
Here’s more info about Jules and Simone, and why they kick ass:
Jules is a super smart, know-it-all teen. Since her mother’s recent death, she has focused her attention on being the first person to make scientifically-proven contact with the dead. Although the loss of her mother was the initial inspiration for her obsession, it’s the far more narcissistic goal of personal fame and power that pushes her. Jules’ personality and charms have kept her from getting a job and worrying about the impact of her self-centred quest on the life of her sister whose hard work keeps the family afloat.
Simone doesn’t want to be doing any of the things that she does. She resents her responsibilities, but you’d never know. A year after her mother’s death, Simone has had to make all the decisions that someone much older should be making. She works her butt off all day as an apprentice plumber and spends her evenings caring for Jules and her often non-responsive father. Despite that, Simone is still the person you would nominate for “most well-adjusted”. She is kind, tough-as- nails, and keeps up with the raunchy jokes of her male coworkers. She will fix your toilet, balance your family chequebook and embrace you in her warmest hug all in one day.
Watch the trailer here.

This is Jules and Simone, sisters and superheroes from the upcoming webseries, Sisters of Mercy. This show is in the preproduction stage, and we’re trying to build an audience. Watch our trailer, send us your hopes and dreams for female superhero characters, give us some encouragement, share with your friends and followers, show us some love!

Sometimes ridiculous and sometimes dead serious, Sisters of Mercy applies a feminist lens to the superhero genre. It’s about complicated and complex women characters, women working together, women making jokes - starring two women of colour!

Here’s more info about Jules and Simone, and why they kick ass:

Jules is a super smart, know-it-all teen. Since her mother’s recent death, she has focused her attention on being the first person to make scientifically-proven contact with the dead. Although the loss of her mother was the initial inspiration for her obsession, it’s the far more narcissistic goal of personal fame and power that pushes her. Jules’ personality and charms have kept her from getting a job and worrying about the impact of her self-centred quest on the life of her sister whose hard work keeps the family afloat.

Simone doesn’t want to be doing any of the things that she does. She resents her responsibilities, but you’d never know. A year after her mother’s death, Simone has had to make all the decisions that someone much older should be making. She works her butt off all day as an apprentice plumber and spends her evenings caring for Jules and her often non-responsive father. Despite that, Simone is still the person you would nominate for “most well-adjusted”. She is kind, tough-as- nails, and keeps up with the raunchy jokes of her male coworkers. She will fix your toilet, balance your family chequebook and embrace you in her warmest hug all in one day.

Watch the trailer here.

courtandthecity:

Just a few congratulatory tweets to the ever so graceful Lupita Nyong’o!

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