Women Who Kick Ass
“It's fine to show pride parades from all over the world despite their problematic elements, but I think we need to acknowledge and call out those problematic elements rather than just reblog with no commentary. At least in the US, 'protection of freedom' such as the freedom to have a pride parade is often used as justification for imperialist war. This erases the queer people who live in those countries such as Palestine, who are oppressed, brutalized & killed in the name of 'freedom to be gay'”

—Anonymous

“There is no reason for anybody to be proud of Israel! "Marriage equality" is just a way for Israel to veil its violations of Palestinians' human rights. Read: Israel and ‘Pinkwashing’ by Sarah Schulman in the New York Times (google it).”

takemetoponyisland

“About Israel and Pride. (1) The Star of David can also be a Jewish symbol, not necessarily Israeli. (2) I understand an LGBT Israeli being proud of living in a country where LGBT and straight couples have basically equal recognition: there are civil unions; civil marriage celebrated abroad is recognised - there's no civil marriage in Israel, *regardless of orientation*. Also, being an LGBT citizen of the only country in the region where being gay is not illegal you tend to count your blessings.”

feathers

“Dif Anon, but if we ignored Pride Parades on stolen land, we'd have to ignore any parades in the US, Australia, South Africa, and quite a number of other countries. I love your answer to the question, but I wanted to bring up that point too.”

—Anonymous

“hi umm I'm sorry but why is there an israeli flag in the last picture you shared? what is the point of a gay pride parade if that pride parade is on stolen land. i think your posts need to be more considerate to issues regarding race,occupation and colonialism. a pride parade where the israeli flag is being waved is extremely offensive to not only palestinian women but to all people fighting for justice in palestine”

—Anonymous

Firstly, I’m not entirely comfortable discussing non-Anglo colonialism, because I literally don’t have any idea what to say about anything that isn’t rehashed thoughts of other people that aren’t at all understandable anyway (rehashed ideas rarely are.)

I’m not educated enough to be coherent, I don’t know history or culture and I don’t understand nearly enough to be able to critically analyse at the drop of a hat. What I do know is that there are a great deal of fantastic people talking about events- like the Palestinian-Israeli occupation that should be heard over myself.

As for the Pride Parade. Queer people aren’t some magical people that are 100% offence/violence excempt people made of rainbows and sunshine and justice. There are queer Israeli people (and yes women) who will fly that flag, and I feel like images like the post in question need to circulate to show that yes, Queer Pride exists alongside super horrible things.

Pride Parades exist in Israel. I cannot stop that.

The point of pride parades varies. Sometimes they are for great and beautiful things and intersectional and for justice. Sometimes they erase some of their own community and fight for assimilated equality. I cannot stop this. I cannot influence this.

I would go as far as to say that 3/4ths of the world currently has entire countries built on stolen land. Heck, I’m from Australia and I can definitely say that colonialism and occupation doesn’t stop Pride Parades. I’m not suggesting at all that I condone this, because I don’t- but I feel like images like this need to be shared to show the entirety of the queer community. We are not exempt from perpetrating violence, but in the end I cannot stop flags from being flown, and erasing the bad in the Queer Community is damning the Queer Community to falling into our own narrative of ‘do no wrong’. Pride parades in theory are wonderful, but not always in practice.

But in the end, I cannot write a damning critique for everything, because I literally cannot know everything about the world, and because these critiques already exist in the world, from people who have more of a right to speak than I.

As always, our ask box exists because of this. So that people can write in and tell us about things, and I fully expect that people will send us asks after this and. I encourage that. I am grateful that you took the time to write in to us, and I will endeavour to learn and be more considerate, but in the end we need to show the reality of the Queer Community as flawed people, the reality of Pride clashing with other issues.

Note: Look, I have about 5 hours/week for this blog, usually less considering that university is cutting deeply into my time. I literally don’t have the time to engage with everything, and spend time working thoughts into words or reading up on occupations and colonialism around the world to make those words make sense when I’m not even getting 8 hours of sleep a day. I trust that you wonderful folks will engage with this blog to help support that, but I do feel like this needs to be expressed.

gaywrites:

Happy Pride Month! Check here for a small sampling of Pride events taking place all over the world, and stay tuned all month for more Pride photos, recaps and more! 

“Do you know of any stock interview forms for women in STEM fields? My aunt got her degree in engineering in the late 70s, and I'd like interview her about the experience, being a woman in that field at that time, but I struggle to put together questions for various reasons.”

mabith

Afraid I don’t, but I’m sure our followers have a few ideas!
Good luck!

semiticsemantics:


Please Share. LGBTQ Teen Jewish resources save lives.  You never know if one of your Facebook friends could use this important information.
The next JQY Teen Phone Call-in will be on Tuesday, May 6th at 8:00 PM Eastern Time.  The topic is “Being LGBTQ Teens in Our Schools, Synagogues, and Communities - Challenges and Triumph? If you or someone you know is interested in joining this call, please contact: JustinJQY@gmail.com

semiticsemantics:

Please Share.
LGBTQ Teen Jewish resources save lives.
You never know if one of your Facebook friends could use this important information.

The next JQY Teen Phone Call-in will be on Tuesday, May 6th at 8:00 PM Eastern Time.
The topic is “Being LGBTQ Teens in Our Schools, Synagogues, and Communities - Challenges and Triumph?
If you or someone you know is interested in joining this call, please contact: JustinJQY@gmail.com

it-used-to-be-fun:


My family is from Nigeria, and my full name is Uzoamaka, which means “The road is good.” Quick lesson: My tribe is Igbo, and you name your kid something that tells your history and hopefully predicts your future. So anyway, in grade school, because my last name started with an A, I was the first in roll call, and nobody ever knew how to pronounce it. So I went home and asked my mother if I could be called Zoe. I remember she was cooking, and in her Nigerian accent she said, “Why?” I said, “Nobody can pronounce it.” Without missing a beat, she said, “If they can learn to say Tchaikovsky and Michelangelo and Dostoyevsky, they can learn to say Uzoamaka.” 

Bella Naija, 2014 (x)

it-used-to-be-fun:

My family is from Nigeria, and my full name is Uzoamaka, which means “The road is good.” Quick lesson: My tribe is Igbo, and you name your kid something that tells your history and hopefully predicts your future. So anyway, in grade school, because my last name started with an A, I was the first in roll call, and nobody ever knew how to pronounce it. So I went home and asked my mother if I could be called Zoe. I remember she was cooking, and in her Nigerian accent she said, “Why?” I said, “Nobody can pronounce it.” Without missing a beat, she said, “If they can learn to say Tchaikovsky and Michelangelo and Dostoyevsky, they can learn to say Uzoamaka.” 

Bella Naija, 2014 (x)

gradientlair:

Maya Angelou (April 4, 1928-May 28, 2014). Dancer. Singer. Poet. Author. Speaker. Educator. Creative. Inspirer. Mother. Black woman. Beautiful. She means so much to me. Everything. May she rest in peace. 

"My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style."

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.
The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.
The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 
For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

Very interesting info! Thanks for this.

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.

The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.

The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 

For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

Very interesting info! Thanks for this.

davyjr:

we-get-shit-done:

sktagg23:

“You educate a man; you educate a man. You educate a woman; you educate a generation.”  ― Brigham Young

(Source)

#GirlPower

preach it

dats-how-dany-does-it:

lawdgevus:

Against all odds, and she made it.  Great job!!

#BlackExcellence

dats-how-dany-does-it:

lawdgevus:

Against all odds, and she made it.  Great job!!

#BlackExcellence

womenrockscience:

electricspacekoolaid:

Sepideh: Reaching For The Stars

"Dear Mr. Einstein, watching the documentary about Anouseh Ansari really motivates me. Tonight I am going stargazing again. Everyday, every night I dream of floating in space."

In a small rural village far from Tehran a young Iranian astronomer named Sepideh has a dream of becoming an astronaut. Sepideh is encouraged by friends and held back by her family, who want a more traditional Iranian life for her. Sepideh’s family expects her to get married and work the lands to provide for her family the traditional way. She is even threatened with death by her uncle who warns Sepideh not to disappoint god by studying the sky. This is an inspiring and eye opening film about one woman’s struggle and her brave pursuit to achieve her dream. Brought to you by by:

Chime For Change: A community of people working to promote education, health and justice for every girl, every woman everywhere. 

Directed By: Berit Madsen

Watch the Trailer here

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