Women Who Kick Ass

Judith Scott: Why she kicks ass
Tw: Ableism.
She was an internationally renowned American fiber artist, who initially acquired fame as an ‘Outsider’ artist, as Judith’s sculptures reflect little cultural input and are highly individualistic. 
Judith was found to be “ineducable,” not even qualified for the class for children with learning disabilities. Her deafness unrecognised, she was thought to be profoundly retarded. Consequently, on medical advice, her parents placed Judith in the Columbus State Institution (formerly the Columbus State School) an institution for the mentally retarded, on October 18, 1950. This separation had a profound effect on both her, and her twin sister.
In 1985, her sister became her legal guardian. Judith moved to California, a state where all mentally retarded citizens are entitled to an ongoing education. Soon she started attending the Creative Growth Art Center.
Casually observing a fiber art class conducted by visiting artist Sylvia Seventy, and using the materials to hand, she spontaneously invented her own unique and radically different form of artistic expression. While other students were stitching, she was sculpting with an unprecedented zeal and concentration.
 During the last 18 years of her life she worked passionately to create over 200 sculptures, some small and intimate, others so large she could barely move them without help.  
She spoke to the world through her sculptures, which seem at different times to reflect the colorful, tactile world of her childhood; the memories and feelings of isolation in state institutional care; and above all, her sense of twinness.
Her work became immensely popular in the world of outsider art, and her pieces sold for up to $15,000. Her art is held in the permanent collections of the Art Brut Connaissance & Diffusion Collection (Paris and Prague), Museum of American Folk Art (Manhattan, New York), Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art (Chicago, Illinois), L’Aracine Musee D’Art Brut (Paris, France), Collection de l’art brut (Lausanne, Switzerland), and the American Visionary Art Museum (Baltimore, Maryland).
In 2006, San Francisco filmmaker Betsy Bayha released the 30 minute documentary Outsider: The Life and Art of Judith Scott. In the same year, Lola Barrera and Iñaki Peñafiel released the feature length documentary ¿Qué tienes debajo del sombrero? (What’s under your hat?) about Scott, and Philippe Lespinasse released Les cocons magiques de Judith Scott, a documentary filmed a few weeks before Scott’s death.
In 2009, Scott Ogden and Malcolm Hearn produced the documentary Make that examined the lives and art-making techniques of Judith Scott and self-taught artists Royal Robertson, Hawkins Bolden and Ike Morgan.

Judith Scott: Why she kicks ass

Tw: Ableism.

  • She was an internationally renowned American fiber artist, who initially acquired fame as an ‘Outsider’ artist, as Judith’s sculptures reflect little cultural input and are highly individualistic. 
  • Judith was found to be “ineducable,” not even qualified for the class for children with learning disabilities. Her deafness unrecognised, she was thought to be profoundly retarded. Consequently, on medical advice, her parents placed Judith in the Columbus State Institution (formerly the Columbus State School) an institution for the mentally retarded, on October 18, 1950. This separation had a profound effect on both her, and her twin sister.
  • In 1985, her sister became her legal guardian. Judith moved to California, a state where all mentally retarded citizens are entitled to an ongoing education. Soon she started attending the Creative Growth Art Center.
  • Casually observing a fiber art class conducted by visiting artist Sylvia Seventy, and using the materials to hand, she spontaneously invented her own unique and radically different form of artistic expression. While other students were stitching, she was sculpting with an unprecedented zeal and concentration.
  •  During the last 18 years of her life she worked passionately to create over 200 sculptures, some small and intimate, others so large she could barely move them without help.  
  • She spoke to the world through her sculptures, which seem at different times to reflect the colorful, tactile world of her childhood; the memories and feelings of isolation in state institutional care; and above all, her sense of twinness.
  • Her work became immensely popular in the world of outsider art, and her pieces sold for up to $15,000. Her art is held in the permanent collections of the Art Brut Connaissance & Diffusion Collection (Paris and Prague), Museum of American Folk Art (Manhattan, New York), Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art (Chicago, Illinois), L’Aracine Musee D’Art Brut (Paris, France), Collection de l’art brut (Lausanne, Switzerland), and the American Visionary Art Museum (Baltimore, Maryland).
  • In 2006, San Francisco filmmaker Betsy Bayha released the 30 minute documentary Outsider: The Life and Art of Judith Scott. In the same year, Lola Barrera and Iñaki Peñafiel released the feature length documentary ¿Qué tienes debajo del sombrero? (What’s under your hat?) about Scott, and Philippe Lespinasse released Les cocons magiques de Judith Scott, a documentary filmed a few weeks before Scott’s death.
  • In 2009, Scott Ogden and Malcolm Hearn produced the documentary Make that examined the lives and art-making techniques of Judith Scott and self-taught artists Royal Robertson, Hawkins Bolden and Ike Morgan.
215 notes
  1. shakurarts reblogged this from womenwhokickass
  2. polillon reblogged this from womenwhokickass
  3. hegel-hey reblogged this from womenwhokickass
  4. the-unmundane reblogged this from judithscott
  5. horrorhammer reblogged this from womenwhokickass and added:
    Judith Scott
  6. no-dickpix reblogged this from joopinks
  7. stopdropandbeauty reblogged this from wrestlingaknife
  8. beafrantic reblogged this from sktagg23
  9. teabooksandchocolate reblogged this from center-for-chthonic-studies
  10. bottledminx reblogged this from oakttree
  11. kettunainen reblogged this from center-for-chthonic-studies
  12. oakttree reblogged this from center-for-chthonic-studies
  13. center-for-chthonic-studies reblogged this from witchwolfprince
  14. queerxicano reblogged this from brujitaxicanita
  15. witchwolfprince reblogged this from brujitaxicanita
  16. sopes reblogged this from brujitaxicanita
  17. brujitaxicanita reblogged this from rootless-but-grounded
  18. animamosaic reblogged this from womenwhokickass
  19. clares-facade reblogged this from womenwhokickass
  20. themadcapmathematician reblogged this from maycontainfeminists
  21. walkskipjogrunfly reblogged this from wrestlingaknife
  22. curiouserandcuriouser-aiw reblogged this from resistancehappens
Breakaway Theme
Design by Athenability
Powered by Tumblr