Women Who Kick Ass

Waziyatawin: Why she kicks ass
She is a Dakota writer, teacher, and activist from the Pezihutazizi Otunwe (Yellow Medicine Village) in southwestern Minnesota.
She is a Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples in the Indigenous Governance Program at the University of Victoria, and is recognized as a leading indigenous intellectual.
 Her research interests include indigenous women’s roles in resisting colonialism, recovering indigenous knowledge, and truth-telling as part of restorative justice.
She is also the founder and council member of Oyate Nipi Kte, a non-profit organization dedicated to the recovery of Dakota traditional knowledge, sustainable ways of being, and Dakota liberation(www.oyatenipikte.org).
After receiving her Ph.D. in American history from Cornell University in 2000, she earned tenure and an associate professorship in the history department at Arizona State University where she taught for seven years. She currently holds the Indigenous Peoples Research Chair in the Indigenous Governance Program at the University of Victoria in British Columbia.
he is the author, editor, or co-editor of six volumes including: Remember This!: Dakota Decolonization and the Eli Taylor Narratives (University of Nebraska Press 2005); Indigenizing the Academy: Transforming Scholarship and Empowering Communities(University of Nebraska Press 2004); For Indigenous Eyes Only: A Decolonization Handbook(School of Advanced Research Press 2005); In the Footsteps of Our Ancestors: The Dakota Commemorative Marches of the 21st Century (Living Justice Press 2006); What Does Justice Look Like? The Struggle for Liberation in Dakota Homeland (Living Justice Press 2008); and, her most recent volume, For Indigenous Minds Only: A Decolonization Handbook (School of Advanced Research Press, 2012).
As an activist, Waziyatawin gained public attention in 2007 when she was arrested multiple times while protesting the Minnesota sesquicentennial celebration. The protests aimed to raise awareness of broken treaties and colonial violence, including the hanging of 38 Dakota men during the Dakota War of 1862 (the largest mass execution in American history).
In 2011, she travelled to Palestine with a group of indigenous and women of colour scholars and artists including Angela Davis, Chandra Talpade Mohanty, and Ayoka Chenzira. Afterwards the group published a statement endorsing the boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) movement. She has drawn connections between the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and colonialism in North America.

Waziyatawin: Why she kicks ass

  • She is a Dakota writer, teacher, and activist from the Pezihutazizi Otunwe (Yellow Medicine Village) in southwestern Minnesota.
  • She is a Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples in the Indigenous Governance Program at the University of Victoriaand is recognized as a leading indigenous intellectual.
  •  Her research interests include indigenous women’s roles in resisting colonialism, recovering indigenous knowledge, and truth-telling as part of restorative justice.
  • She is also the founder and council member of Oyate Nipi Kte, a non-profit organization dedicated to the recovery of Dakota traditional knowledge, sustainable ways of being, and Dakota liberation(www.oyatenipikte.org).
  • After receiving her Ph.D. in American history from Cornell University in 2000, she earned tenure and an associate professorship in the history department at Arizona State University where she taught for seven years. She currently holds the Indigenous Peoples Research Chair in the Indigenous Governance Program at the University of Victoria in British Columbia.
  • he is the author, editor, or co-editor of six volumes including: Remember This!: Dakota Decolonization and the Eli Taylor Narratives (University of Nebraska Press 2005); Indigenizing the Academy: Transforming Scholarship and Empowering Communities(University of Nebraska Press 2004); For Indigenous Eyes Only: A Decolonization Handbook(School of Advanced Research Press 2005); In the Footsteps of Our Ancestors: The Dakota Commemorative Marches of the 21st Century (Living Justice Press 2006); What Does Justice Look Like? The Struggle for Liberation in Dakota Homeland (Living Justice Press 2008); and, her most recent volume, For Indigenous Minds Only: A Decolonization Handbook (School of Advanced Research Press, 2012).
  • As an activist, Waziyatawin gained public attention in 2007 when she was arrested multiple times while protesting the Minnesota sesquicentennial celebration. The protests aimed to raise awareness of broken treaties and colonial violence, including the hanging of 38 Dakota men during the Dakota War of 1862 (the largest mass execution in American history).
  • In 2011, she travelled to Palestine with a group of indigenous and women of colour scholars and artists including Angela DavisChandra Talpade Mohanty, and Ayoka Chenzira. Afterwards the group published a statement endorsing the boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) movement. She has drawn connections between the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and colonialism in North America.
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